Papers, Articles, Reports & Submissions 2006 – 2010


Women With Disabilities Australia: Submission to the Attorney-General’s Department on initial views to inform the Australian Government’s report under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) (September 2009) [PDF [Word]

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is an international human rights treaty and is the response of the international community to the long history of discrimination, exclusion and dehumanisation of people with disabilities. It was ratified by the Australian Government on July 2008, and entered into force in Australia in August 2008. To meet their reporting obligation under the CRPD, States must report submit an initial report two years after joining and then every four years. The Australian Government’s initial report under the CRPD is due in August 2010. The Australian Government recently invited non-government organisations and members of the public to submit any initial views on information that they would like to see included in the Australian Government’s report. This document is WWDA’s brief submission to the Australian Government, outlining some of the key issues WWDA believes should be addressed in the Government’s initial report. Copyright WWDA September 2009.


Women With Disabilities Australia: Submission to the National Human Rights Consultation (May 2009) [PDF]  [Word]

This Submission is the response from Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA) to the National Human Rights Consultation. The national public consultation about the legal recognition and protection of human rights and responsibilities in Australia was launched by the Australian Government on 10 December 2008, the 60th anniversary of the adoption by the United Nations of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The independent Committee established to undertake the nationwide consultation is to report to the Australian Government by 31 August 2009. WWDA’s Submission highlights the fact that although Australia has embraced and ratified a number of international human rights treaties and instruments affirming its commitment to protect and promote the human rights of women and girls (including women and girls with disabilities), in practice, they have had little bearing on improving the human rights of women and girls with disabilities in Australia – who continue to experience serious violations of their human rights, as well as failures to promote and fulfil their rights. WWDA’s Submission focuses on several key human rights where there are continuing abuses against women with disabilities in Australia, and clearly demonstrates that the human rights of women with disabilities in Australia are not currently sufficiently protected and promoted. Copyright WWDA 2009.


‘Brave New World? – Is the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities a blueprint for Utopia?’ – By Sue Salthouse (2009) [HTML]  [PDF]  [Word]

Women with disabilities in Australia are over-represented in the most marginalised portion of the population. The twin discriminations of disability and gender, coupled with political, corporate and community neglect over many years have entrenched us amongst the poorest of the poor. A raft of prolonged and pro-active measures is needed to address this polarisation. Systemic advocacy is a primary tool which Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA) has used to begin the long haul to redress and eradicate these imbalances. National and international funding support has enabled WWDA to conduct several capacity building projects. This paper examines the successes and shortfalls of these activities. It looks at whether the new UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) will help or hinder WWDA’s agenda. Copyright WWDA May 2009.


Women With Disabilities Australia: Submission in response to the Australian Government’s Discussion Paper: ‘Developing a National Disability Strategy for Australia’ (December 2008) [HTML] [PDF] [Word]

In November 2008, the Australian Government released for consultation its Discussion Paper ‘Developing a National Disability Strategy for Australia’. The paper was prepared to inform people about the Australian Government’s plans to improve support and remove barriers for people with disability, their families and carers, and to ask for ideas about how this can be best achieved. This Submission is WWDA’s response to the Discussion Paper ‘Developing a National Disability Strategy for Australia’. Copyright WWDA December 2008.


Australian Human Rights & Equal Opportunity Commission: Promoting the Ratification and Implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Australia (2007) [PDF]  [Word]

These background papers were compiled to assist Australian disabled persons’ organisations to prepare for the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission’s Workshop on Promoting the Ratification and Implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Australia. Copyright 2007.


Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC): Report to the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission on the Workshop on Promoting the Ratification and Implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in Australia (2007) [PDF]  [Word]

This is a summary report of the preparation for, conduct and outcomes of a Workshop on Promoting the Ratification and Implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in Australia held with the support of the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission on 27 and 28 June 2007 in Sydney. Copyright 2007.


University of Birmingham (UK): Preventing Social Exclusion of Disabled Children and Their Families – Literature review paper produced for the National Evaluation of the Children’s Fund (2006) [PDF]

This report presents current evidence concerning the social inclusion of disabled children and their families, and was developed following an extensive search of academic and policy literature published over the past decade. The focus is on the need for and impacts of preventative (rather than critically responsive) services and strategies for disabled children aged between five and 13 years. Copyright 2006.


National Disability Authority (NDA), Dublin: The Dynamics of Disability and Social Inclusion (2006) [PDF]

This study uses data from the Living in Ireland Surveys (LISs), 1995-2001, to see how employment, income and relative income poverty, and social participation changed when someone moved from not experiencing disability to reporting disability (referred to as disability onset) or vice versa (referred to as disability exit), which provides a valuable insight into the impact of disability holding other things constant. Copyright 2006.