Papers, Articles, Reports & Submissions 1995 – 2000


‘Bringing Down the Barriers: The Labour Market and Women with Disabilities in Ontario’ – By Gail Fawcett (2000) [Word]

Integrating quantitative research with qualitative research, this report provides insights into the complex interplay of factors that create employment barriers for women with disabilities. While women and men with disabilities are typically both affected by the same barriers to employment, they are not always affected to the same degree or in the same way. Because of both their gender and their disability, women often face a unique obstacle course when trying to navigate their way through the world of paid work. Copyright 2000.


Women With Disabilities Australia: Submission to the Interim Report on Welfare Reform “Participation for a More Equitable Society” (April 2000)

In March 2000, the Federal Government’s Reference Group on Welfare Reform released their Interim Report entitled “Participation Support for a More Equitable Society”. The Interim Report was released following a public consultation process. WWDA developed a response to the Interim Report. WWDA’s response is provided under the following themes: Mutual Obligation Versus Social Justice and Rights; Costs of Participation; The Need for An Integrated and Coordinated Approach to Welfare Reform; Discrimination in Employment and Women With Disabilities; The Concepts of Family & Community in Welfare Reform; Individualised Model of Social Support; and, The Future Job Growth in Australia. Copyright WWDA 2000.


Women With Disabilities Australia: Submission to the Federal Government’s Reference Group on Welfare Reform (Dec 1999)

In late September 1999, Senator Jocelyn Newman (Minister for Family and Community Services) announced that social policy would be the next major reform priority of the Howard Government. Senator Newman also announced that a Reference Group would guide the development of a Discussion Paper on Welfare Reform. This document is WWDA’s first submission to the Reference Group on Welfare Reform. It discusses: why the Welfare Reform agenda is important for women with disabilities; the main welfare reform issues for women with disabilities (using case studies to highlight these issues); Welfare Reform agenda principles; and critical outcomes for women with disabilities. Copyright WWDA 1999.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘The Search for the Invisible Workers: Enhancing Employment Opportunities for Older People With Disabilities’ – by Patricia Woodcroft-Lee (1999)

Although it is frequently noted that more people are living longer and are more active in their later years, very little information appears to be available on the needs and lifestyles of older people who are working or who are seeking paid work. Older workers in general appear to be paid very little attention in the literature and older workers with disabilities are almost invisible. This paper has two aims; one is to attempt to draw together the available data on older workers with disabilities and to make some suggestions as to how we may be able to compile statistical data on this group, the second aim is to identify the types of support that older workers with disabilities may require to continue working and contributing to society for as long as they choose, while still enjoying a reasonable quality of life. Copyright WWDA 1999.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘Workplace Diversity Programs and Equal Employment Opportunity’ – by Aileen McFadzen (1998)

Although the concept of a Workplace Diversity Program is new, the application of equal employment opportunity principles to the Australian public service is not. Despite the fact that Commonwealth Departments have developed equal opportunity programs as required under the Public Service Act and presumably implemented the 1993 Strategic Plan for Equal Opportunity in the Public Service, discrimination, be it on the basis of sex and/or disability, happens. This paper analyses the double disadvantage experienced by women with disabilities in relation to their employment. It outlines the key features of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992. All new initiatives in the area of equal employment opportunity need to be understood in the context of the legal framework for non discriminatory action. The author draws on her experience as a practitioner in the area of disability discrimination to outline some of the key factors which are relevant in findings of disability discrimination under the Disability Discrimination Act in the Australian Public Service. Copyright WWDA 1998.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘Targeting a Disability Allowance’ – by Margaret Cooper (1996)

The paper is based on the premise that a carefully targeted component model allowance, to offset the unavoidable costs of disability, is the most cost effective way of relieving the poverty of people with disabilities who have to pay high support costs. The paper also proposes a Model and criteria for the development of a standardised disability allowance. Copyright 1996.


‘Women In Sheltered Workshops’ – By Jodie Emerson Taken from: Women and Disability – An Issue. A Collection of writings by women with disabilities

This is taken from a collection of writings by women with disabilities. The collection was written by the Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective with the help of other disabled women in Victoria and South Australia. It was produced by the Melbourne based Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective in the late 1980’s. The exact publishing date is unknown. Copyright.


‘I Worked In A Workshop’ – By Josie Cooke Taken from: Women and Disability – An Issue. A Collection of writings by women with disabilities

This is taken from a collection of writings by women with disabilities. The collection was written by the Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective with the help of other disabled women in Victoria and South Australia. It was produced by the Melbourne based Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective in the late 1980’s. The exact publishing date is unknown. Copyright.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘Double Disadvantage’ – Barriers Facing Women With Disabilities in Accessing Employment, Education and Training Opportunities: A Discussion Paper’ – by Natalie Tomas (1991)

‘Double disadvantage’ is intended to provide background information on the barriers confronting women with disabilities wishing to access education, employment and training. It brings together existing research findings, surveys and other data on women with disabilities including the observations and experiences of individual women with disabilities. Much of the material for this paper came from documented accounts of women with disabilities’ experiences of barriers to employment, education and training. This paper has a twofold purpose: 1. To provide women with disabilities with information and suggested strategies for action to enable them to better access education, employment and training options; and 2. To provide information and raise issues among people with disabilities, women’s groups, disability rights organisations, trade unions, government decision makers, equal opportunity practitioners, disability service providers and any other interested groups or individuals to enable them to begin to consider, take account of and then develop strategies to overcome the ‘double disadvantage’ of gender and disability. Copyright 1991.