Papers, Articles, Reports & Submissions 1995 – 2000


British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health: The Challenges of Change – The Midlife Health Needs of Women With Disabilities – By Marina Morrow with the Midlife Health Needs of Women with Disabilities Advisory Committee (2000) [PDF]

This study highlights the interconnections between menopause, disability and aging. Interviews were conducted with thirty-nine women with physical disabilities and chronic illnesses. Twelve interviews were conducted with women with developmental disabilities and their caregivers. These interviews probed the women’s experiences and thoughts about the relationship between menopause, midlife, disability and aging. This is the report of the study. Copyright 2000.


Women With Disabilities Australia: A Report on the International Women’s Health Conference (Scotland, July 1999) – by Diane Temby (1999)

The Second International Interdisciplinary Conference on Women and Health was held in Edinburgh Scotland, 12-14 July 1999. WWDA was represented at the Conference by Dianne Temby, who presented a paper on women with disabilities and health. This is a report from Dianne Temby on the Second International Interdisciplinary Conference on Women and Health. Copyright WWDA 1999.


‘Surviving the Change – Menopause and Women with Disabilities’- by Lynne Swanson (1998)

This paper by Lynne Swanson was originally published in Abilities Magazine, Spring Issue, 1998. The article focuses on effects of menopause were on women with multiple sclerosis (MS). Copyright 1998.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘Burning Issues for People with Disabilities’ – by Elizabeth Hastings (1998)

This is a transcript of a speech given by Elizabeth Hastings at the Annual General Meeting of Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA), in Melbourne, September 12 1998. Elizabeth Hastings was the former (and the first) Disability Discrimination Commissioner in Australia. Elizabeth Hastings passed away in late 1998. The paper examines a number of issues including: A Discrimination free world to live in; Conditions in Congregate Care; Abuse in Institutions; Care for the whole person; Sterilisation of minors; Genetic Manipulation; Spiritual life and development; The bottom line; Attrition of Human Rights protection; and, Assisted Communication. Copyright 1998.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘In the Hands of the Receivers’ – by Margaret Cooper and Dianne Temby (1997)

As women with disabilities, the authors contend that an unintentional effect of imposing health policy for women from the top down, translated mainly through traditional service models, has meant that health and illness care strategies have developed with the same formalised or rigid boundaries which act as obstacles and barriers to keep many women out of women’s health services. Women with disabilities find themselves at the bottom of the pyramid of policy influence and many who seek health advice and management actually feel more oppressed. The authors use the population of women with disabilities to illustrate the effects of marginalisation on health care. Copyright 1997.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘Mindsets: The Sticks and Stones that break more than bones’ – by Margaret Cooper and Dianne Temby (1997)

For increasing numbers of people throughout the world the self-management of chronic health or disability is an issue of significance to them and health service providers. The illness care system is experiencing the impact of the issues of ‘chronicity’ as they effect the lives and abilities of more and more citizens. The capacity of service providers to facilitate effective rehabilitation, which places the person at the centre of all interventions and remedies, is sorely challenged in a health service system permeated by a philosophy of restraint and control. The focus of this paper rests with the person engaged in disability. The use of personal vignettes and comparative analysis are used to explore how health beliefs and mindsets have a significant influence on the role of rehabilitation providers and self management outcomes for people with enduring changes to their health and abilities. Copyright 1997.


Women With Disabilities Australia: Address to the Centre for Women’s Health Matters, Australian Capital Territory (1997)

This is a transcript of a speech given by Helen Skeat (past WWDA Executive Officer) at the 1997 Annual General Meeting of the Centre for Women’s Health Matters, Australian Capital Territory. The speech highlights a number of health issues for women with disabilities. It also challenges women’s health services to develop inclusive policies and practices to better meet the health needs of women with disabilities. Copyright WWDA 1997.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘Disability, Feminism and Eugenics: Who has the right to decide who should or should not inhabit the world?’ – by Joan Hume (1996)

In this paper the author explores the implications of the resurgence of the “new eugenics” as a philosophy underpinning modern reproductive practices from the perspective of the abuse and denigration of the rights in people with disabilities in general and women with disabilities in particular. These practices also infringe women’s rights and should be a matter of grave concern for all feminists. The discussion is not about the rights and wrongs of the abortion debate but adopts a disability rights interpretation of new reproductive and genetic technologies. Copyright 1997.


‘Energy is a Lifeforce’ – By Loraine Lewis Taken from: Women and Disability – An Issue. A Collection of writings by women with disabilities

This is taken from a collection of writings by women with disabilities. The collection was written by the Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective with the help of other disabled women in Victoria and South Australia. It was produced by the Melbourne based Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective in the late 1980’s. The exact publishing date is unknown. Copyright.


‘When Fate Puts a Scorpion In The Hands Of A Woman’ – By Mavis Taken from: Women and Disability – An Issue. A Collection of writings by women with disabilities

This is taken from a collection of writings by women with disabilities. The collection was written by the Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective with the help of other disabled women in Victoria and South Australia. It was produced by the Melbourne based Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective in the late 1980’s. The exact publishing date is unknown. Copyright.


‘Incontinence’ – Two Views Taken from: Women and Disability – An Issue. A Collection of writings by women with disabilities

This is taken from a collection of writings by women with disabilities. The collection was written by the Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective with the help of other disabled women in Victoria and South Australia. It was produced by the Melbourne based Women with Disabilities Feminist Collective in the late 1980’s. The exact publishing date is unknown. Copyright.


Women With Disabilities Australia: ‘Women – Moving Beyond The Disability’- by Lina Pane (1995)

This paper examines 4 main themes: Inequality between men and women with disabilities in the sharing of power and decision making at all levels; Insufficient initiatives to promote the advancement of women with disabilities; Triple disadvantage – looking at women with disabilities from non-English speaking backgrounds; and the unmet health needs of women with disabilities. The paper argues that women and society, in general need to examine the experience of women as universal. This includes gender, age, culture, sexuality and disability. Whilst only women with disabilities can speak for women with disabilities, others with overlapping concerns such as non-disabled women and men with disabilities, are equally responsible in the task of working towards change. Copyright WWDA 1995.