Graphics and Media – WWDA Human Rights Toolkit


GRAPHICS & MEDIA

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WWDA developed a series of infographics for distribution across social media to promote the WWDA Human Rights Toolkit and Position Statements. Each image was accompanied by one or two key points about a key human rights issue related to that position statement. These infographics are available to download and share below, or you can share, retweet or like from WWDA’s Facebook or Twitter feeds, just make sure to include a link back to the position statements: http://wwda.org.au/papers/toolkit/position-statements

 


WWDA Position Statement 1: The Right to Freedom From All Forms of Violence


 A young woman sits in silhouette on an open window ledge. Her hands rest on her slightly raised knees. She looks outwards into an urban landscape. WWDA Position Statement 1: The Right to Freedom from All Forms of Violence

Violence against women is one of the most widespread violations of human rights worldwide and is now firmly at the forefront of the international development agenda as an urgent human rights issue requiring national government and international action.Unequivocally, WWDA believes that all women and girls with disability have the right to freedom from all forms of violence, abuse, exploitation and neglect, regardless of the setting in which the violence occurs, and regardless of who perpetrates it.

Download Violence position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A young woman sits in silhouette on an open window ledge. Her hands rest on her slightly raised knees. She looks outwards into an urban landscape.


A woman with a disability aged in her 40s rests her head on her hands on the roof of a small shed. She has a determined and contented expression and looks directly at the camera. WWDA Position Statement 1: The Right to Freedom from All Forms of Violence

Violence against women and girls with disability is a form of disability discrimination, a form of gender-based discrimination, and often occurs within, and as a result of, intersectional forms of discrimination. Women with disability experience extensive discrimination across a range of settings, including the justice system. A common impact of violence for mothers with disability is the removal of their children by authorities based only on the presence of disability.

Download Violence position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A woman aged in her 40s rests her head on her hands on the roof of a small shed. She has a determined and contented expression and looks directly at the camera.


 A close-up portrait photograph of a young Aboriginal woman in her late teens. The young woman has a focused expression and looks toward the left. She has a piercing in her bottom lip. WWDA Position Statement 1: The Right to Freedom from All Forms of Violence

WWDA is unequivocal in its position of actively opposing all forms of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation against women and girls with disability in all settings across Australia, including in private homes, group homes, boarding houses, supported accommodation facilities, day programs, mental health facilities, prisons, schools, hospitals, out-of-home-care, immigration detention centres, aged care facilities, other closed settings, and workplaces.

Download Violence position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A close-up portrait photograph of a young woman in her late teens. The young woman has a focused expression and looks toward the left. She has a piercing in her bottom lip.


A portrait photograph of a young Aboriginal girl with a disability. The young girl has her head turned toward the camera and smiles. WWDA Position Statement 1: The Right to Freedom from All Forms of Violence

WWDA subscribes to an inclusive definition of ‘violence against women’ that recognises that ‘Violence against women’ occurs on a continuum that spans interpersonal and structural violence; acknowledges the structural aspects and factors of discrimination, including structural and institutional inequalities; and analyses social and economic hierarchies between women and men (inter-gender inequalities) and among women (intra-gender inequalities).

Download Violence position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A portrait photograph of a young girl with a disability. The young girl has her head turned toward the camera and smiles.


A Blind woman aged in her 30s relaxes on the grass in a park with a dog which she is patting. She wears dark glasses, a black head band. A white cane rests across her outstretched legs. WWDA Position Statement 1: The Right to Freedom from All Forms of Violence

WWDA believes the epidemic of violence against women and girls with disability is continuing unabated due to deep-rooted inequality and extreme forms of discrimination against women and girls with disability.

Download Violence position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A Blind woman aged in her 30s relaxes on the grass in a park with a dog which she is patting. She wears dark glasses, a black head band. A white cane rests across her outstretched legs.


WWDA Position Statement 2: The Right to Decision-Making


Two women relax and talk in an open park. One woman sits in a wheelchair while the other sits cross-legged on the grass. Both women are being expressive and happy. WWDA Position Statement 2: The Right to Decision-Making

Making decisions, big and small, about every aspect of our lives and what we do is a fundamental human right. The decisions and choices that we make enable us to express our views, our personalities, our desires, our preferences, as well as our thoughts on what is important to us in life. The outcomes of our choices and decisions can be good and bad, and it is these outcomes that help us to learn and gain experience, confidence, and knowledge. Being able to make our own decisions also allows us to participate in our communities and broader society.

WWDA believes women and girls with disability must be afforded their full decision-making rights and opportunities in all aspects of their lives.

Download Decision-making position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] Two women relax and talk in an open park. One woman sits in a wheelchair while the other sits cross-legged on the grass. Both women are being expressive and happy.


A woman with an intellectual disability looks out a glass door and smiles. Her reflection is just visible in the glass door. WWDA Position Statement 2: The Right to Decision-Making

WWDA believes women and girls with disability have the right to receive all necessary supports to make meaningful and informed decisions. Support must respect the human rights, autonomy, will and preferences of women and girls with disability and should never amount to substitute decision-making.

Download Decision-making position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A woman with an intellectual disability looks out a glass door and smiles. Her reflection is just visible in the glass door.


A young girl aged five wraps her arm around a woman and rests her head on her shoulder. The girl’s eyes are firmly shut. The woman’s back is turned to the camera. WWDA Position Statement 2: The Right to Decision-Making

The right to decision-making is fundamental to the realisation of agency, autonomy and self-determination.

WWDA calls on the Australian Government to adopt and promote all necessary measures for the development, advancement and empowerment of women and girls with disability by recognising them as distinct rights holders, providing channels for voice and agency, raising self-confidence, and increasing their power and authority to make decisions in all areas of their lives.

Download Decision-making position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A young girl aged five wraps her arm around a woman and rests her head on her shoulder. The girl’s eyes are firmly shut. The woman’s back is turned to the camera.


A young Aboriginal woman rests her head against her hand. She is grinning and looking directly into the camera. WWDA Position Statement 2: The Right to Decision-Making

WWDA believes that accurate and accessible information is a prerequisite for the provision of active, free and informed consent and meaningful decision-making of women and girls with disability in all matters.

Download Decision-making position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A young woman rests her head against her hand. She is grinning and looking directly into the camera.


Two young girls play in a park. One girl sits in a wheelchair and the other is standing behind and pushing the wheelchair. Both girls are smiling and happy. WWDA Position Statement 2: The Right to Decision-Making

The denial of the right to meaningful decision-making and participation has led to many women and girls with disability being denied a number of other rights, including the right to vote, marry, have or adopt children, develop social and intimate relationships, realise their sexual and reproductive rights, access education, live their lives free from violence, and, fulfil their basic rights to liberty of the person and freedom of movement.

Download Decision-making position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] Two young girls play in a park. One girl sits in a wheelchair and the other is standing behind and pushing the wheelchair. Both girls are smiling and happy.


WWDA Position Statement 3: The Right to Participation


A woman rides past an old building on a motorized scooter. A small dog on a leash runs alongside the woman. WWDA Position Statement 3: The Right to Participation

Meaningful participation across all aspects of cultural, social, economic and political life plays a significant role in the promotion of democratic governance, law, human development, empowerment, social inclusion, economic development, and the realisation of all other human rights.

WWDA believes the right to participate directly and indirectly in political, economic, social and cultural life is a fundamental human right to which all women and girls with disability are entitled.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A woman rides past an old building on a motorized scooter. A small dog on a leash runs alongside the woman.


[Image] A woman in her 20s with shaved hair and eye shadow looks directly into the camera with an intense but friendly expression. WWDA Position Statement 3: The Right to Participation

The widespread denial of the right to social, cultural, economic and political participation is continuing unabated due to deep-rooted inequality and extreme forms of discrimination against women and girls with disability. This has to end.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A woman in her 20s with shaved hair and eye shadow looks directly into the camera with an intense but friendly expression.


A profile photograph of a blind woman who wears a black hair band, dark sunglasses and holds a white cane. WWDA Position Statement 3: The Right to Participation

Wide-ranging systemic failures in legislation, policies and service systems in Australia have facilitated conditions that continue to deny the participatory rights of women and girls with disability. These failures are evident in laws and practices which foster and enable substitute decision-making and denial of legal capacity, as well as laws which facilitate egregious human rights violations such as forced sterilisation, forced abortion and forced living arrangements.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A profile photograph of a blind woman who wears a black hair band, dark sunglasses and holds a white cane.


A close up photograph of an elder looks off camera with a focused expression. WWDA Position Statement 3: The Right to Participation

The ability and the right to full and effective participation is dependent on access to accurate, accessible and appropriate information.

Many women and girls with disability are denied the right to seek, receive and impart information about decisions affecting their lives. Information concerning issues relevant to women and girls with disability is rarely available in timely, comprehensive, and accessible ways. Governments and service providers rarely provide information in the full range of accessible formats, such as in as sign language, Braille, large print, audio, Easy English, plain and/or non-technical language, captioned video, in languages other than English, or through the provision of accessible and usable web sites.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A close up photograph of an elder who looks off camera with a focused expression.


A young woman with a physical disability is clasping her hands together and laughing. She appears to be in a park on a sunny day. WWDA Position Statement 3: The Right to Participation

Participation of disabled women as citizens is at the basis of the recognition of our dignity. For women and girls with disability, participation in social and political life and ensuring an adequate standard of living depends on their equal access to social structures and supports including education, employment, health care and housing, and, the free enjoyment of the most fundamental human rights, including sexual and reproductive rights and freedom from all forms of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation. Although there has been progress in women’s participation in decision-making globally, the participation of women with disability in all areas of public life in Australia remains inadequate.

Find out more:

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A young woman with a physical disability is clasping her hands together and laughing. She appears to be in a park on a sunny day.


WWDA Position Statement 4: Sexual and Reproductive Rights


  A man and woman embrace each other and smile toward the camera. WWDA Position Statement 4: Sexual and Reproductive Rights

Sexual and reproductive rights are fundamental human rights. They include the right to dignity, equality, autonomy and self-determination – the right of everyone to make free and informed decisions about, and have full control over – their body, sexuality, health, relationships, and if, when and with whom to partner, marry and have children, without any form of discrimination, stigma, coercion or violence.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A man and woman with disability embrace each other and smile toward the camera.


A young woman leaning forward in a wheelchair. She has short hair, a neutral expression and stares intently toward the camera. WWDA Position Statement 4: Sexual and Reproductive Rights

Women with Disabilities Australia (WWDA) believes that forced sterilisation, forced abortion, and forced contraception constitute egregious forms of sexual violence against women and girls with disability and are a violation of the right to freedom from torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A young woman leaning forward in a wheelchair. She has short hair, a neutral expression and stares intently toward the camera.


A woman holds a 6-week old baby. She gently kisses the child on the forehead. WWDA Position Statement 4: Sexual and Reproductive Rights

Women and girls with disability are largely excluded and ignored in sexual and reproductive rights and health policy, service and program development, including the development of information, education and training resources.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A woman holds a 6-week old baby. She gently kisses the child on the forehead.


A seated woman in her 20s looks off camera and laughs happily. WWDA Position Statement 4: Sexual and Reproductive Rights

It is largely through the actions of women with disability themselves – locally, nationally and globally – that the history and culture of exclusion and inaction is being challenged, and women with disability are demanding and reclaiming their sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms.

Women with disability argue that one of the best ways to challenge oppressive practices, cultures and structures is to come together with other women with disability – to share experiences, to gain strength from one another and to work together on issues that affect them.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A seated woman in her 20s looks off camera and laughs happily.


A woman in her 20s sits in a wheelchair and holds several notebooks. She wears a leather jacket and smiles toward the camera. WWDA Position Statement 4: Sexual and Reproductive Rights

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was ratified by Australia on 17 July 2008. Its fundamental purpose is to promote, protect and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disability, and to promote respect for their inherent dignity. The CRPD contains several provisions regarding sexual and reproductive rights.

Download Participation position statement:

Access WWDA Human Rights Toolkit for Women and Girls with Disability:

[Image] A woman in her 20s sits in a wheelchair and holds several notebooks. She wears a leather jacket and smiles toward the camera.


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